Rainbow shine

By Ava

Once upon a time, there was a girl who is a princess named Ava. There is also another princess named Lily. There also was a princess named Clara, and we all played on the playground. And then, there was a mommy and daddy. There also was a playground where we can all play. The end.

Ava Princess

By Ava

Once upon a time there was a princess named Ava, and she had sisters named Lily and Clara. Her mom and dad were thinking about a party for her. And then she went outside so her parents couldn't see her.

And then she decided to make a birthday cake for herself. And then there was a monster. That monster almost got her, but it was only a person.

It was one of her sisters. It was Clara. And Lily was a princess, so she went back into the castle, and she started writing. And then there was another thing that she wanted to add to it. Her sister was in the picture.

Princesses

Ava and Lily at a fall festival

By Ava

Once upon a time, there was a princess whose name was Ava. And then there was a horse. And then the horse had a prince on it. And then the prince told the princess how to do art. And then she already made art. And then she showed the prince her art project.

THE END

Updated Performance Against Seed Expectations

Some of you are probably familiar with the Performance Against Seed Expectations (PASE) metric used with the men's tournament brackets. In short, the metric takes into account how many games a seed is expected to win based on past performances since 1985 (the first year of the 64-team tournament). I use this metric to determine expected offensive statistical totals for the college basketball fantasy league that I run each March.

Gonna give you up? NEVER!

With the 10th anniversary of "The Developers" happening this year (right now, in fact!), I wanted to address a sensitive issue regarding Rick Astley.

I didn't invent the rickroll, at least, not directly.

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Random News

Finished! Well, not really

I finally completed the last chapter of "Polos to Ties." I wish I could say that I'm ready to publish, but I have plenty of cleanup left to do. Right now, I'm sending queries and proposals to literary agencies, hoping that one of them will push to the major publishing houses. I've had interest, but I still haven't inked a deal just yet.

Also, I'm in the process of selecting an editor or two to help refine my novel. I'll post more details when I announce my picks.

Partying online since 1999

I recently added six months' worth of columns from my first job out of college, at the Crawfordsville (Ind.) Journal Review. The articles appeared both in print and online, and while some of them are obviously outdated, it's interesting to remember what was going on 10 years ago. Wow, I've been writing web articles for a decade! I don't think there are too many others who can say that. Google recently celebrated its 10th birthday, and the oldest index the company has available is from 2001.

Chemistry, in letters, and a lot of time

If you are familiar with the Periodic Table (and if you aren't, please have a chat with your chemistry teacher soon!), you might be interested to know that someone has compiled a list of English words that can be spelled with chemical symbols.

No, the person wasn't me. Actually, the computer did most of the work, but Dr. Nandor's Exhaustive Chemical Words Pages shows a multitude of ways to combine elements to form words.

The headline I thought I'd never write: People are LESS crazy

See that guy in the office next to you? He might be crazy, but he's not quite as crazy as he was a few years ago.

According to my extremely scientific Ultimate Crazy Survey, readers have decreased their craziness by almost three points, from 37 to 34.3. These results were determined by taking the square root of each participant's name, converted into ASCII values, multiplied by a factorial of Avogadro's Number, depending on what time zone you live in. Or maybe it was just by taking point totals from each question, I cannot remember.

Here's a way for the U.S. government to keep track of you

How easy would it be for the United States government to keep tabs on people via the Internet? Soon, Congress could call a vote against Net Neutrality, which would allow ISPs to deliver partner websites faster than others. While this would be disruptive to the World Wide Web as a whole, this still wouldn't give access to data logs from all ISPs.

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