book review

Book review: "Creative Firing" by Chester Burger

In the current state of the U.S. economy, it's pretty difficult to avoid being laid off, fired or, for whatever reason, not having a job for a certain period of time. True, sometimes the employee is entirely to blame for his/her predicament, but more often than that, a company is trying to consolidate, move offices or, in general, save money against the bottom line. Many times, those doing the actual firing and layoffs have to make decisions they would prefer to ignore, yet they have no choice.

New business book for women: The Corporate Dominatrix

As a writer of workplace novels, I try to stay up on the latest and greatest new business books that are out there. There is generally a clear distinction between self-help and narratives, but I do not think it always has to be like that.

Book review: "Crazy '08" by Cait Murphy

I wouldn't imagine a non-baseball fan would actually pick up a baseball book and read it from cover to cover. If there was a book I would recommend to a person who was interested in history but not a huge baseball buff, it's "Crazy '08" by Cait Murphy. And for a baseball fan, this is one book you wouldn't want to be without.

Book review: "Healthy Travel: Don't Travel Without It!" by Michael P. Zimring and Lisa Iannucci

Traveling to new countries is a great opportunity to see customs and cultures that you may not find in your own backyard. While it can be an exhilarating experience, it can also turn into a problem when not properly prepared for the journey. To make sure you have everything you need, I would suggest reading "Healthy Travel: Don't Travel Without It!" by Michael P.

The humanity (or inhumanity) of data

A few glaring items came to mind as I finished reading Roszak's "The Cult of Information:"

Book review: "Resolution 786" by Mohamed Mughal

Regardless of your current view of the Bible, specifically the Old Testament, it would be difficult to argue that every single passage ultimately displayed a God of complete compassion to all mankind. Many assume that various actions taken during this period were necessary "evils," while others do not think so highly of destroying some beings for the benefit of others.

Book review: "30 Careers Before 30" by Daniel Lakstins

While I do not consider myself an expert in many things, one thing I feel a bit knowledgeable about is the genre of business-related books. I haven't read all 540,495,317 books in this field, nor do I plan to do so, because most are written by authors who think that because a company made billions of dollars by having its employees wear Hawaiian shirts on Fridays, the CEO of said company is a genius.

Book review: "Twisted Confessions" by Charles E. Skoller

These days, most people are content to watch "CSI" or "NCIS" to receive their fill of criminal investigations. While the shows are entertaining, they are obviously not real, and as we all know, usually the truth is stranger than fiction.

Book review: "Subway" by Horace Mungin

Before moving to Baltimore, I had had little experience riding most types of mass transportation. Back at home in Louisville, I occasionally took the bus places, but most of my other experiences were infrequent. I can count on one hand the number of cities (Chicago, Boston, Seattle, San Francisco) where I had ridden some form of public transit.

Book review: "Catch-22" by Joseph Heller

Writing a review for Catch-22 by Joseph Heller is sort of Catch-22. If I don't tell you enough about it, you probably won't be interested in the book. But if I tell you too much, you won't have to read it because you'll already know what it's about.

But I suppose I should try.

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